#15

More snow here in Utah, and definitely cold, most days hover in the low 30’s. Everyone keeps working hard and we are looking forward to our first visit from Tony Brett and Brett Acoustics in early January. Here’s what has happened since the last update:

  Trusses showed up and the guys got to work setting them.

Trusses showed up and the guys got to work setting them.

  Once all the trusses were set over studio 1, Jared, our superintendent, realized that the framers had set nearly half of them upside down. A few hours later everything was fixed and by the end of the next day all the trusses were in place over the studio spaces.

Once all the trusses were set over studio 1, Jared, our superintendent, realized that the framers had set nearly half of them upside down. A few hours later everything was fixed and by the end of the next day all the trusses were in place over the studio spaces.

  Finishing up the the rest of the titan bolts that hold the ledger board to the concrete block.

Finishing up the the rest of the titan bolts that hold the ledger board to the concrete block.

  All the studio space trusses in place and ready for sheeting. (Lobby trusses were built incorrectly so those will go up a little later.)

All the studio space trusses in place and ready for sheeting. (Lobby trusses were built incorrectly so those will go up a little later.)

  Setting the OSB sheeting over the trusses.

Setting the OSB sheeting over the trusses.

  With all the sheeting set the roofers showed up with materials and an eye toward getting the place “dried in.”

With all the sheeting set the roofers showed up with materials and an eye toward getting the place “dried in.”

  Setting the foam insulation on the roof.

Setting the foam insulation on the roof.

  Rolling out the membrane over the foam, the seams are heat welded with a torch to keep things waterproof.

Rolling out the membrane over the foam, the seams are heat welded with a torch to keep things waterproof.

  Finished roof

Finished roof

  Setting trusses in the lobby. The plan is to paint the trusses and have everything exposed but I’m second guessing that at the moment because a simple sheetrock ceiling would hide a lot of the unusual transitions between the house / lobby / studio spaces.

Setting trusses in the lobby. The plan is to paint the trusses and have everything exposed but I’m second guessing that at the moment because a simple sheetrock ceiling would hide a lot of the unusual transitions between the house / lobby / studio spaces.

  Landscape work continues out front. This will be a step down fire pit with a bench all the way around. Hoping it will give clients and engineers a place to hang out when they need some fresh air.

Landscape work continues out front. This will be a step down fire pit with a bench all the way around. Hoping it will give clients and engineers a place to hang out when they need some fresh air.

IMG_4941.JPG
  Our landscape designers,    Planted Studio   , spec’d a lot of these grasses for the edges of the property. These will grow to 6-7 feet tall and form a hedge that, along with a perimeter fence, will hopefully give us a fairly private outdoor space.

Our landscape designers, Planted Studio, spec’d a lot of these grasses for the edges of the property. These will grow to 6-7 feet tall and form a hedge that, along with a perimeter fence, will hopefully give us a fairly private outdoor space.

  Looking down Studio 1 from the booths into the future control room. Still waiting for that snow sitting where the console will be to melt.

Looking down Studio 1 from the booths into the future control room. Still waiting for that snow sitting where the console will be to melt.

  Looking down Studio 2 toward the booth. The doorway the guys are framing will be french doors into the iso booth.

Looking down Studio 2 toward the booth. The doorway the guys are framing will be french doors into the iso booth.

  Looking down the hallway between studios toward the back door. OSB sheeting going up on the walls.

Looking down the hallway between studios toward the back door. OSB sheeting going up on the walls.

Finally moved the time-lapse cameras so we could keep capturing the work going on within the walls. The video below is updated to show the work through November 30. I was really hoping to capture the trusses being set but due to the cold weather the batteries died quickly and the cameras were out the day before the trusses were delivered! New batteries are in now and the cameras are back on the job, just need to remember to change them more often.

#14

Now that the concrete is ready, framing has begun in earnest. Real snow fell today, so the sooner they get this roof on the better.

  Putting up the ledger board that the roof trusses will sit atop.

Putting up the ledger board that the roof trusses will sit atop.

IMG_0002.jpg

More ledger board up as well as bottom plates for the hallway between studios and the wall between the back of control room 2 and the instrument storage room.

  Bottom plate for the back wall of control room 1.

Bottom plate for the back wall of control room 1.

  Raising the first wall - west side of studio 1 and the booths. Pretty sure this method the framers are using wouldn’t be OSHA approved, it can be pretty sketchy at times, but its quite entertaining to watch.

Raising the first wall - west side of studio 1 and the booths. Pretty sure this method the framers are using wouldn’t be OSHA approved, it can be pretty sketchy at times, but its quite entertaining to watch.

  First wall of the hallway, the trusses will rest and “handshake” on the hallway walls. Looking north toward the back of the house, studio 1 on the left, studio 2 on the right.

First wall of the hallway, the trusses will rest and “handshake” on the hallway walls. Looking north toward the back of the house, studio 1 on the left, studio 2 on the right.

  The doorway on the left side of the frame will be the entrance to studio 1 from the hallway.

The doorway on the left side of the frame will be the entrance to studio 1 from the hallway.

  Landscapers also showed up this week and started putting in sprinkler lines as well as working on the fire pit out front. Not sure if those guys are planning to be back tomorrow now that there are a few inches of snow on the ground, but I hope so.

Landscapers also showed up this week and started putting in sprinkler lines as well as working on the fire pit out front. Not sure if those guys are planning to be back tomorrow now that there are a few inches of snow on the ground, but I hope so.

  The enormous transformer that the city requires also arrived.  I have no idea what kind of bushes could ever hide this hideous thing but we will do our best.

The enormous transformer that the city requires also arrived. I have no idea what kind of bushes could ever hide this hideous thing but we will do our best.

  Ariel shot showing the framing that has been done so far. So much road still ahead of us, but tomorrow morning trusses show up and in a week or so we should have this place dried in.

Ariel shot showing the framing that has been done so far. So much road still ahead of us, but tomorrow morning trusses show up and in a week or so we should have this place dried in.

#13

Happy Thanksgiving! This was a good week (week and a half) for studio building, it was cold but no rain or snow - next week’s forecast doesn’t look so good.

First of all we have a floor!

  Working the fresh concrete in the future lobby. The plan, although it could always change, is to have concrete floors in the lobby, instrument gallery and hallways, and then wood floors in the two studios.

Working the fresh concrete in the future lobby. The plan, although it could always change, is to have concrete floors in the lobby, instrument gallery and hallways, and then wood floors in the two studios.

  This is looking from the back door at most of Studio 1. We ordered some pvc boxes to make up the troughs that will sit beneath the floor under the consoles. The boxes will give us a nice clean tie in to the 4’ pipes that carry the audio lines into/out of the control rooms. Unfortunately the boxes didn’t show up in time for the main slab pour, so we boxed out the area around to give us some play in the pipes and that will be poured in the next few weeks.

This is looking from the back door at most of Studio 1. We ordered some pvc boxes to make up the troughs that will sit beneath the floor under the consoles. The boxes will give us a nice clean tie in to the 4’ pipes that carry the audio lines into/out of the control rooms. Unfortunately the boxes didn’t show up in time for the main slab pour, so we boxed out the area around to give us some play in the pipes and that will be poured in the next few weeks.

  Due to the temperature the slab had blankets over it every night for a week, removed during the day to allow for work. Here they are cutting the expansion joints and control joints between the studio spaces.

Due to the temperature the slab had blankets over it every night for a week, removed during the day to allow for work. Here they are cutting the expansion joints and control joints between the studio spaces.

  The boxes arrived and the electricians set to work getting them in the ground.

The boxes arrived and the electricians set to work getting them in the ground.

IMG_0123.JPG
  The boxes and gravel ready for the final slab pour. Not sure if they will do that soon or wait for a roof to be on the building so they can keep the concrete a bit warmer.

The boxes and gravel ready for the final slab pour. Not sure if they will do that soon or wait for a roof to be on the building so they can keep the concrete a bit warmer.

  Meanwhile out back there was work going on to install our oil separator and line for water drainage from the roof of the new building. It’s so exciting to get to spend thousands of dollars on concrete things that get buried in the ground. Actually its a total drag, but the city requires it so it is what it is.

Meanwhile out back there was work going on to install our oil separator and line for water drainage from the roof of the new building. It’s so exciting to get to spend thousands of dollars on concrete things that get buried in the ground. Actually its a total drag, but the city requires it so it is what it is.

  This was a short work week due to the holiday but a small amount of framing has begun. Next week I expect there will be a lot more framing and maybe some landscaping work out front.

This was a short work week due to the holiday but a small amount of framing has begun. Next week I expect there will be a lot more framing and maybe some landscaping work out front.

#12

Things have been cooling down a lot here in Utah, todays high was 44 and the low was 24. We even had a small amount of snow the other night so we definitely need to get a roof on this place. The underground work finished up with the placement of the pipes that will carry most of the audio lines. 

  This is Control Room 1, or A, haven’t decided which to go with. I figure its easier to call them 1, 2 and 3 or A, B and C than other names, but I'm a bit more intrigued by numbers lately, so for now…this is control room 1. We are looking across the control room diagonally here, so the wall on the left side is the rear of the room, the pipes standing straight up on the right side of the frame will be in the front wall. The console will sit there in the middle with a trough beneath for cable to feed into, and then you can see the various pipes leading to what I've labeled.

This is Control Room 1, or A, haven’t decided which to go with. I figure its easier to call them 1, 2 and 3 or A, B and C than other names, but I'm a bit more intrigued by numbers lately, so for now…this is control room 1. We are looking across the control room diagonally here, so the wall on the left side is the rear of the room, the pipes standing straight up on the right side of the frame will be in the front wall. The console will sit there in the middle with a trough beneath for cable to feed into, and then you can see the various pipes leading to what I've labeled.

  Next this crazy truck shows up, part dump truck, part treadmill. Gravel was dumped out of the truck on to this treadmill that could go up and down, left and right and could speed up to throw gravel off at 100mph. The man on the right had a remote and just basically directed the gravel exactly where he needed it. He could get it to shoot clear across the building and land in just the spot he wanted.

Next this crazy truck shows up, part dump truck, part treadmill. Gravel was dumped out of the truck on to this treadmill that could go up and down, left and right and could speed up to throw gravel off at 100mph. The man on the right had a remote and just basically directed the gravel exactly where he needed it. He could get it to shoot clear across the building and land in just the spot he wanted.

  They raked the gravel out and made sure it got everywhere evenly, using string lines to get the elevation correct.

They raked the gravel out and made sure it got everywhere evenly, using string lines to get the elevation correct.

  Once they started shaping the spots for footings we got our first taste of how everything would really lay out. To be honest I’m a little surprised to find that the rooms seem smaller than I had imagined they would be, but a) I think that’s just fine, I mean after all how often do we need cavernous rooms and who am I to think I could afford them and b) our interior designer mentioned that things tend to feel smaller until spaces start to be more defined and some scale can be realized. This photo above is Control Room 2 and behind it, in the right side of the frame is our instrument storage room.

Once they started shaping the spots for footings we got our first taste of how everything would really lay out. To be honest I’m a little surprised to find that the rooms seem smaller than I had imagined they would be, but a) I think that’s just fine, I mean after all how often do we need cavernous rooms and who am I to think I could afford them and b) our interior designer mentioned that things tend to feel smaller until spaces start to be more defined and some scale can be realized. This photo above is Control Room 2 and behind it, in the right side of the frame is our instrument storage room.

  This may seem minor, but to be honest this cross beam that holds up the rear corner of the old house was a big deal for me. Don’t get me wrong, when an earthquake happens I still don’t want to be in the adobe-brick turn-of-the-last-century house, but at least now I don’t need to worry that its going to just decide to fall on someone one day.

This may seem minor, but to be honest this cross beam that holds up the rear corner of the old house was a big deal for me. Don’t get me wrong, when an earthquake happens I still don’t want to be in the adobe-brick turn-of-the-last-century house, but at least now I don’t need to worry that its going to just decide to fall on someone one day.

  With the gravel in place and the slab set to be poured, the masons showed up to fill the large hole in the back of the building.

With the gravel in place and the slab set to be poured, the masons showed up to fill the large hole in the back of the building.

I made another video for you this week, just a basic walk through with the gravel down so it was easy to see where the rooms laid out. I have absolutely no business using these video editing programs (premier pro, after effects) but it’s fun to mess around with, even though what should have taken someone 30 minutes took me 5 hours. Nonetheless, enjoy…

#11

The walls finally are tall enough to block the time-lapse cameras so it’s time to move those to a new location. Here is a time-lapse of our build thus far:

 Concrete finally showed up for the front yard. It’s hard to believe how luxurious it feels to have an actual concrete path to walk on to the house, not to mention that we have a driveway to park in again!

Concrete finally showed up for the front yard. It’s hard to believe how luxurious it feels to have an actual concrete path to walk on to the house, not to mention that we have a driveway to park in again!

IMG_1656.JPG
 This patio in front of the new lobby will get a pergola overhead and a tall fence to enclose the area. The current plan is to get rid of the outhouse but I’m open to suggestions.

This patio in front of the new lobby will get a pergola overhead and a tall fence to enclose the area. The current plan is to get rid of the outhouse but I’m open to suggestions.

 The underground work continues. The smaller conduit is for power (many home-runs), the larger 4” pipe is for audio connections.

The underground work continues. The smaller conduit is for power (many home-runs), the larger 4” pipe is for audio connections.

 The pipes he is laying out will go from the trough under the console into the credenza/rack.

The pipes he is laying out will go from the trough under the console into the credenza/rack.

 The ground here is very rocky which makes it difficult for running the many ground rods. It took three guys and an electric ground rod driver to get this one in.

The ground here is very rocky which makes it difficult for running the many ground rods. It took three guys and an electric ground rod driver to get this one in.

 Here you can see the all the conduit which still won’t be complete for another day or two. Ive overlayed a basic version of the plans to show where the studio rooms will lay out.

Here you can see the all the conduit which still won’t be complete for another day or two. Ive overlayed a basic version of the plans to show where the studio rooms will lay out.

#10

The walls are finished, well, kind of. The exception is the large hole in the back wall which remains open for equipment access.

  The guys finishing the last bit of block for the east wall.

The guys finishing the last bit of block for the east wall.

  Looking down the west side of the house, the driveway and pathways are nearly set for concrete. Looking forward to having something other than dirt for clients to walk in on!

Looking down the west side of the house, the driveway and pathways are nearly set for concrete. Looking forward to having something other than dirt for clients to walk in on!

  The cable coming out of the ground will feed the large transformer that the city requires. Behind you can see the beginnings of a fire pit / seating area we will be putting in the front yard.

The cable coming out of the ground will feed the large transformer that the city requires. Behind you can see the beginnings of a fire pit / seating area we will be putting in the front yard.

  This will be the new main entrance to the studios. I was really impressed with how the masons worked around the old eaves with the block.

This will be the new main entrance to the studios. I was really impressed with how the masons worked around the old eaves with the block.

IMG_0357.jpg
  Today the underground work started. This photo shows the plumbers tying into the new sewer line from the new janitor closet and bathroom. They finished most of their work today so the rest of the week should be the electricians who have a lot to do. We will also be running conduit to carry lines from the house into the studios and between the studios, as well as the lines that go from the racks to the consoles and the machine rooms.

Today the underground work started. This photo shows the plumbers tying into the new sewer line from the new janitor closet and bathroom. They finished most of their work today so the rest of the week should be the electricians who have a lot to do. We will also be running conduit to carry lines from the house into the studios and between the studios, as well as the lines that go from the racks to the consoles and the machine rooms.

  The new lobby on the right and the studios spaces / bathroom / janitor closet on the left.

The new lobby on the right and the studios spaces / bathroom / janitor closet on the left.

  Plumbers getting the drain lines installed, door on the right is lobby into the janitor closet, door on the left is lobby into the bathroom. the large opening is lobby into the hallway which will run between studios.

Plumbers getting the drain lines installed, door on the right is lobby into the janitor closet, door on the left is lobby into the bathroom. the large opening is lobby into the hallway which will run between studios.

DJI_0254.JPG

#9

We are just 3 courses of block from of the walls. There is still a large opening in the back of the building - kept there for access to the inside. That hole will be filled once the underground work starts next week.

  East wall, lower section is the lobby out in front of the higher studio spaces.

East wall, lower section is the lobby out in front of the higher studio spaces.

  Looking north toward the lobby and the house.

Looking north toward the lobby and the house.

Today the structural steel showed up. These beams will support the weight of the roof surrounding the house - nothing will bear on the old walls, the roofs will just be tied together.

  looking into the lobby through what will be the front door.

looking into the lobby through what will be the front door.

  looking west down the hallway that separates the studio spaces from the old house.

looking west down the hallway that separates the studio spaces from the old house.

DJI_0220.JPG
DJI_0228.JPG

Looking forward to reaching the final height on the walls tomorrow and also to beginning work on the front landscaping. Still managing to keep working in the house, mixing and recording.

#8

The walls are nearly there, the lobby area has reached the top and the studio section has 8 feet left to go. We expect the block to be finished this week, with the underground work (plumbing, electrical, audio) to follow right after.

Photo Oct 19, 6 52 18 PM.jpg
Photo Oct 19, 6 52 50 PM.jpg
Photo Oct 18, 6 33 10 PM.jpg

#7

One week later and things are beginning to change -  it finally looks like something is being built!

Before I get into that, one thing I forgot last week...before the footings were backfilled, Dave, one of the superintendents, remembered that I was hoping to have the ability to run a digital snake out of the building.   The studio shares a block with Velour Live Music Gallery, which is the premier local music club and with a cat 5 cable as a digital snake we will be able to split the stage feed and multitrack local shows. Dave grabbed a drill and got some conduit through the stem wall so we can have a cable buried and get into the building without having to go through a door.    

IMG_5831.jpeg
DJI_0110.JPG

Monday - rough grading and compacting was completed, concrete block arrived and was laid out.

photo oct 8.jpg


Tuesday - the walls started going up

Photo Oct 09, 2 44 41 PM.jpg

Wednesday - more block went up until the walls reached the height of the first “lift” (four feet).   

DJI_0174.JPG


Thursday - scaffolding began to be set up and the concrete truck showed up to grout the first lift.   The walls will be completely filled with concrete which is good for sound but bad for the guy who someday wants to knock the place down.

Photo Oct 11, 3 56 58 PM.jpg

Friday - more block, got close to the second lift, including the stripes of charcoal colored block which, although likely futile, are an effort to draw attention away from just how enormous and prison-like the outside of this building is going to be.

DJI_0192.JPG
IMG_0181.jpeg

We went through a number of different options for the stripes on the building.


This week we also spent time planning for landscaping, scheduling with Brett Acoustics and Canova Audio, and laying out the security and access systems.

Will we get to the top of the wall this coming week?  Stay tuned to find out.








#6

Things are beginning to cool down here, snow on top of the mountains, so the race is on to get some walls and a roof up.

IMG_5448.jpg

Once the footings were dug we got to see the incredible foundation of the house. I’m sure its probably how all the older homes in the area were constructed, but it doesn’t inspire a lot of confidence to see the stacked river rock that holds things up. The plywood / boarded up window is the other side of this:

SWP_8566.jpg

Eventually this will be open between the old house and the new space, the door to the left will go out to reception, the window will look down the hall between the studios.

IMG_1494.jpg
IMG_6156.jpg

The footings were formed, in the second photo you can see the copper wire which is bound to the footing rebar in multiple locations to create the Ufer ground.

Concrete showed up and the footings were poured quickly.

DJI_0082 2.JPG
IMG_9968.jpg

The rebar standing up out of the footings is for the stem wall which connects the footings to the above-ground walls. The forms for the stem wall took a couple days to arrive, but it was then formed and poured.

IMG_2452.jpg
IMG_5034.jpg
DJI_0128 2.JPG

Now, with the forms off, it’s getting a bit easier to see the spaces and how things will lay out.

 This will be the new entrance to the studio. The two lower spots in the wall behind will be the doorways to a janitor closet and a new bathroom. The house wall on the right and the window will eventually be interior walls and the bolts and plates seen on top of the concrete toward the right will hold steel beams that will support the new roof.  Here is a look at how things will layout

This will be the new entrance to the studio. The two lower spots in the wall behind will be the doorways to a janitor closet and a new bathroom. The house wall on the right and the window will eventually be interior walls and the bolts and plates seen on top of the concrete toward the right will hold steel beams that will support the new roof.

Here is a look at how things will layout

DJI_0157 2.JPG

On Friday the trenches were backfilled and tomorrow we expect to see concrete block arrive and hopefully start going up.

IMG_7929.jpg

#5

Lots of work done this week. We now have no concrete surrounding the house, no good way in or out, but we do have a new water line and a new sewer line, which we did not have for a few days this week. Asking clients to walk a block to the grocery store to use the bathroom was not my favorite, but everyone understands and has been easy going. We also had to postpone a few sessions this week while the compactor nearly shook the house down, and for about 7 hours on Thursday when the temporary power feed was knocked out.

 The old overhead power service was removed and this last bit of the old addition was prepped to be removed.

The old overhead power service was removed and this last bit of the old addition was prepped to be removed.

 Once the old steps and wall were removed it became easier to see what it will look like inside our new lobby once it is complete. The white door with the caution tape will be removed and stairs will lead down into the new lobby. Behind that door will be our kitchen and eating area.

Once the old steps and wall were removed it became easier to see what it will look like inside our new lobby once it is complete. The white door with the caution tape will be removed and stairs will lead down into the new lobby. Behind that door will be our kitchen and eating area.

 As the concrete up front was removed the water line under the driveway broke, which led to us being without water for a few days until they could get the new line run.

As the concrete up front was removed the water line under the driveway broke, which led to us being without water for a few days until they could get the new line run.

 The new water line was run where eventually our driveway will be again.

The new water line was run where eventually our driveway will be again.

 The old sewer line was clay and in pretty bad shape, so we had to put a new one in. Half of the street had to be shut down and trenching began. Eventually this trench would stretch across the entire front yard and down the side of the house to tie in and also lead to the new bathrooms that will be built.

The old sewer line was clay and in pretty bad shape, so we had to put a new one in. Half of the street had to be shut down and trenching began. Eventually this trench would stretch across the entire front yard and down the side of the house to tie in and also lead to the new bathrooms that will be built.

 We actually managed some cello overdubs this day, it was really a high point to ask a cello player to maneuver through this mess, and then on top of that tell her we had no water or bathroom.

We actually managed some cello overdubs this day, it was really a high point to ask a cello player to maneuver through this mess, and then on top of that tell her we had no water or bathroom.

Photo Sep 19, 5 25 29 PM.jpg
 I’m very grateful to our contractor and the excavation guys who put in a number of long days this week.

I’m very grateful to our contractor and the excavation guys who put in a number of long days this week.

 The week ended with the guys coming in on Saturday to dig the footings for the new building. I can’t wait to see some new construction.

The week ended with the guys coming in on Saturday to dig the footings for the new building. I can’t wait to see some new construction.

Photo Sep 22, 7 13 33 PM.jpg

#4

Not much to report although work continues.   Things are still being sorted out with the power, but we expect to have the power switched over this week and a new transformer being set right in the front yard.  This transformer is for the house and the new addition, then within the house and the new studios there are additional transformers to isolate the power for the studios.   

The hole in the back where the duplex was is being filled and compacted, and more concrete is being removed.  

We met with our landscape design company, Planted Studio, and got to see their vision for the yard space.  I think clients are going to really love it and it should provide a nice space to hang out during a long session.

This next week should see work starting on our new sewer line, water lines and hopefully some digging for footings.

Here is a time lapse of the work so far:

#3

Demolition continues as we work to sort out the electrical.   At this point we will stick with three phase power.   The impact / permit fees we will owe the city are significant, but, as much of the needed equipment has already been built, it is the cheapest way to go from here.   

IMG_9817.jpg

The trench has been backfilled, and you can see that we moved the condenser for the house a/c to the front yard, a lovely addition, but thankfully temporary, there just wasn't anywhere else to put it that wouldn't be in the way for now.  

IMG_7180.jpg

Most of the trees are now gone, but the addition to the house remained for a few more days while a plan was made for the electrical.

IMG_9812.jpg

Finally the addition was torn off, although they left a small corner where the mast for the electrical comes into the house, once things get switched over that will be torn off.

IMG_9818.jpg

Just a small tree is left to pull out and then the hole to fill and they should be able to start digging for footings.

#2

Our property has the old house up front, along the street, but sitting behind is (was) an old duplex.   The duplex was in the way of the new studio, as is a small addition to the back of the house.   (as of now the duplex is gone, but the addition remains, at least for a few more days.)

To get an overview of the layout watch this quick video:

First up, asbestos removal.  If you are reading this you are likely a musician, or perhaps, even worse, a musician and an audio engineer / producer like me.   Listen up, quit what you are doing right now and get into asbestos removal.  I would be quite surprised to find another line of work that seemingly takes so little skill, but pays so well.   Our asbestos removal cost $14k, and took, wait for it, one and a half days.   Now, I know, they need special suits and fans and stuff (oddly, ours never had any special suits or fans), and you do have to take the materials to a special dump or something that is expensive, but honestly, $14k?!   

  (the addition on the old house, post asbestos removal)

(the addition on the old house, post asbestos removal)

Next, the driveway up front was taken out - we need to run new underground power lines, new water line and get fiber to the house and new building because now they come from the back of the house where things are going to get torn up.

IMG_4859.jpg
IMG_9541.jpg
IMG_6166.jpg

The day before the duplex demolition we took the kids over and let them fulfill the dream they had been talking about for months - they got to beat on things with hammers / bats / axes, and spray paint anything they wanted.

On my way out of the studio that night a friend showed up.   He and I had talked before about the fact that when he was born, his mom and dad brought him home from the hospital to one side of that duplex where they lived at the time.   He asked if he could go have a look around and take some pictures and I told him to have at it and headed home.

The next morning I showed up and saw that the work on the duplex had already begun.

IMG_9543.jpg

Strangely there was no heavy equipment around yet.   I asked the superintendent how they got started but he told me they thought it was something we had done ourselves.    Tire tracks were clear to see leading up to building, and it was clear someone was getting some speed.  We were perplexed, and suddenly a cryptic comment on my studio instagram account from he night before made sense.   The comment read "I may have taken liberties above and beyond what you were granting. If that adds labor to the demolition tomorrow send the bill my way."  and it was from my friend / the former tenant.   Not totally sure why but he decided to have a bit of fun and drive his truck through part of the building.   The next day he sent me this photo:

IMG_9651.PNG

So I suppose we would have to say that this was really the beginning of the demolition.  Incidentally, we found the missing Ford badge in the rubble pile.

The demo, at least thus far, has gone well.  

IMG_1928.jpg

The addition on the house was set to be taken down as well, but first the electrical must be moved.  That is turning out to be a bigger problem than anticipated.  The electricians dug the trench, got the new lines run as well as the new meter and panels, and the city came out and everything passed inspection.  The next day Provo City Power showed up to hook us up and place the new transformer.

IMG_3645.jpg

Unfortunately, when they were going to place the meter it became clear that the city was preparing us for single phase power, while the plans and all the work that had been done, as well as the other equipment which had been ordered were 3 phase power.   Honestly, I really don't even know what that means, but its clear that it's not good and we are now in limbo as we try to figure out where someone screwed up and what the best way forward is.  Needless to say this will cost both time and money.  I'm smart enough to know that I should just go ahead and settle in for a good 12 more months of that!

#1

Finally starting this build thread.  As a record of the long journey to where we are today this first entry is going to be long, very long.  Feel free to skip ahead for current updates, but I want (need?) to document this for myself more than anything.

I grew up in a superb of LA.  After college I moved from California to Utah on a bit of a whim, and opened a small studio in a turn of the century home in downtown Provo.  The studio grew so my wife and I managed to get an SBA loan and with it we renovated the house and improved the gear.

Here are some shots from 2000 after our grand re-opening:

control_room_behind_console_1.jpg
control_room_light_1.jpg
great-room_into_control_room_1.jpg

It was pretty small, maybe 1600 sq feet, but it was nice, sounded good and we stayed busy.  

In 2003 my wife and I decided to move back to LA and were able to sell the studio - the house, the equipment, the name June Audio, all of it.

I found good work in LA, and learned from some amazing engineers and producers, but eventually realized that the studio lifestyle in LA wasn’t going to work for me. After weighing options, we decided to move back to Utah.

At that point the June Audio equipment and name had been sold once again, and had been moved to a new location in Provo - a space designed by Karl Yancher as part of a larger film studio complex.   Their B studio was available so I moved in there as a mix / overdub room, and rented out June Audio studio A as a client when I needed a larger space.

More changes happened and in 2010 I found myself moving into studio A, buying the same gear again and getting the name June Audio back.

Here are some shots of that incarnation of the studio:

IMG_6409.jpg
IMG_6437.jpg

Still just a one-studio operation, but this one was larger - around 2000 sq feet and quiet, clean balanced power, etc.  We didn’t, however, own the building, so while we had a long-term lease, ultimately our fate wasn’t completely in our hands.

In December of 2011 our landlord decided to sell the building - the new owners, a pest control company, weren’t sure they wanted a recording studio in the middle of their building, so we started considering options. Since we still had 6 years left on our lease and our landlord wanted to make good on it, he proposed building us a new studio in another location so he could sell the building with no strings attached.

After a lot of deep diving on Gearslutz and TapeOp.com I knew that if I had the choice I would love to work in a Wes Lachot designed space.   We called Wes and he agreed to fly out to Utah to look at spaces and discuss what we would need. We had a great meeting, but within a few months the new buyers changed their tune and our lease was sold to them along with the building, so now rather than being a recording studio in the middle of a film studio, we were a recording studio in the middle of a pest control office.

We managed to stay very busy despite the fact that coming and going through the pest control offices was strange for us, strange for clients, and I’m sure strange for pest controllers.

Eventually, in need of more office space, our new landlords began to float the idea of us moving out.   The truth was, however, that our lease was pretty sweet and it was hard to want to move, and overwhelming to figure out how to take on a commercial studio build on our own with no deep pockets behind it.

In November of 2014 the pest controllers got serious and offered us a buyout for our lease which was to end in August of 2018.  Knowing a little bit about just how expensive a studio build can be, and realizing it was probably better to leave with some money than to ride out our lease, we signed papers, cashed the check and agreed to be out by August 2016.

So we set about trying to find a new location.   We needed something free-standing (didn’t want to share walls with neighbors if possible), preferably with a large open space and high ceilings.   Although they certainly offer the most bang for the buck, I was hoping not to end up in a roll-up door warehouse / industrial area. Nothing wrong there of course, but they tend to be on the outside of town and I love being close to restaurants, music venues, galleries, and shops so there is somewhere to walk to when a long session requires a break.

We looked everywhere and at everything, my favorite was a former tire store that had been sitting vacant for a few years.  It had great access, great parking, good views and a large open area with 20’ clear ceilings. We made an offer but lost to another buyer.

Next up was a huge former auto dealership / auto garage built in the 1940’s.  This space was far too big for what we needed, but we figured we could lease the extra space, and the location and vibe were great for our studio.   It was, however, along the main street through town, which is loud and busy! In May 2015 we moved forward, made an offer which was accepted, contacted Wes and arranged for him to fly back to Provo to see the space and take measurements.   At this point I had a key to the space and had spent plenty of time dreaming of all the possibilities and how great it was going to be. The day arrived, I headed to the building to meet Wes, fresh off his flight from North Carolina. I was ready to get going and start this design process and get things moving so we would have a new studio to land in when we had to move in late 2016.

  (the auto dealership building)

(the auto dealership building)

Wes showed up, walked in the building, looked around for about 45 seconds and then told me there was no way this building would work, and we would spend every dollar of our budget just trying to get the road noise out of the building and have nothing left to finish the studio interior.   This was a real blow, we had been down the road with realtors, deposits, etc and now we were back to square one, not to mention the fact that we had flown Wes out for 3 days and by 11am on the first day we had nothing left to do. It may sound harsh that Wes shut things down so quickly, but truthfully it’s exactly why we needed someone of his caliber, and exactly what we paid him for.

We spent the rest of the weekend looking around town at other possibilities, and Wes gave us a ton of information about what we should be looking for in a potential building.  

  (Wes and I meeting after the bad news about the auto dealership.  I think the sugar packets on the table might be arranged to talk about monitor placement!)

(Wes and I meeting after the bad news about the auto dealership.  I think the sugar packets on the table might be arranged to talk about monitor placement!)

In August of 2015 the tire shop we missed out on went back on the market after a failed closing and this time our offer was accepted.  I was sure this was the best option so as you may have guessed, in September of 2015, out came Wes once again to see and measure the tire shop.

  (the tire shop)

(the tire shop)

  (the view from what would have been the lounge)

(the view from what would have been the lounge)

IMG_0321.jpg
  (measuring and notating with Wes)

(measuring and notating with Wes)

IMG_0327.jpg

 

With the clock started on our escrow period for the building we got to work meeting with contractors, having plans drawn, paying for appraisals and then phase 1 and phase 2 environmental reports.   We were spending a lot of money and in many cases having to pay to expedite the process in order to make our deadlines. By the end of September 2015 we had our first set of plans from Wes. We would be building a 3 studio complex, an A and B room as well as a smaller production room that we would rent out on a monthly basis.

  (Wes’s initial floor plan for the tire shop)

(Wes’s initial floor plan for the tire shop)

We met with banks. Many, many banks.  I think to this day we have probably met with and even gone all the way through to an approval with 8 or 9 banks.  If you’ve taken out a big SBA loan before, you know just how much work that is. Many nights were spent filling out applications and gathering financials for yet another application.  Some approved us, some denied us, many were very confused by what we were attempting to do, and some just lost interest in something so complicated.

 

In January of 2016 I flew back east to visit some studios that Wes Lachot Design Group had designed.   

Nothing made me more confident in our choice to use Wes and his team than going in these great studios.  I have worked in a lot of different places but I can honestly say I have never heard monitoring like I heard in these control rooms, they were just so incredible to listen in.

I also had the chance to meet Tony Brett and tour his shop - Brett Acoustics. I’m very excited to have him involved in our new space too.

  (Brett Acoustics Durham, NC)

(Brett Acoustics Durham, NC)

Due to all the work that needed to be done with plans and bids and loans we managed to get the seller to extend our escrow and closing was set for February 29, 2016.  Wes and his team continued to refine plans, we continued to gather bids and as commercial development newbies we got ripped off by one contractor to the tune of $10k!  We persisted and things were getting closer to closing and the plan was coming together.

Then, out of the blue, an unusual email.  A real estate development company had been buying up property in the shipping center surrounding the tire store and wanted “our” space as well.   At this point we were into that location nearly $100k between plans, inspections, environmental, deposits, etc etc, so we gave them a polite “thanks but no thanks” - we were moving forward.   They asked for more meetings, and then more meetings, and in the end, with the help of a good friend brought in to negotiate, we assigned our purchase agreement and walked with a pretty serious sum of money - pretty great for never even owning the building.    A couple days after signing over the purchase rights, Wes sent me the final plans for the studio in that space.

The tire shop has since been demolished which hurts my heart a little - I still think it would have been a great studio.  

March 2016, we have some money in the bank, but only 5 months left on our lease and we are busy as ever with sessions.   Clearly we won’t have a new studio built in time, so we begin looking for temporary locations we could use while we build.  A friend let me know that our old location, the house downtown, was sitting vacant and could potentially be for sale again. The good news, the lot the house sits on is large and could fit a large studio (with some significant work), the bad news, the house was in pretty bad shape, no longer a studio, and not even a place where you’d want to bring a client.

After a little more investigation and measuring, we realized the lot was nearly the size of the old tire shop, and started thinking that maybe we could take Wes’s tire shop studio plans and make them fit behind the old house.  We were really hoping to get some value out of them and not have to pay to redraw.

39 West Preliminary Measurements.jpg

With my advanced graphic design skills, I made these layouts in microsoft excel to show the original site layout (above), and how Wes’s tire shop plans could fit in the same space (below).

39 West ideas 1.jpg

Yes, that is a giant concrete box attached to the back of a classic revival turn of the century historic home. It’s fine. We can make it work. It’s an amazing location.

I contacted the current owner, did some negotiating and ended up buying the house, for the second time, and for very nearly double what we had bought it for 17 years earlier. It’s fine. Totally worth it. This area of town is growing and appreciating quickly.

We hired a local contractor to help us rehab the house, and a local architect to design a shell for the new studios.

Before photos of the house:

IMG_2701.jpg
IMG_2525.jpg
IMG_2037.jpg

In July 2016 we took the studio offline, and began to pack up and move things.  The house would serve as a home for our studio while we built the new spaces behind.  We have quite a bit of gear, so moving was a pretty big ordeal and now we have two storage units full of things that won’t fit in the house.

IMG_3279.jpg
IMG_2885.jpg
IMG_2880.jpg
IMG_3203.jpg

Knowing the old space in the pest control building was to be demolished, we pretty much gutted it, saving everything we could from cabling, to track lighting, to light switches & controllers. Other local studio owners came in and took the engineered wood floors, stretched fabric, and insulation out of the walls.

IMG_3325.jpg

While we waited for the house renovation to be completed, we set up gear in my garage to inventory cable and get everything wired up and working - hoping for a quick installation when the house was ready.

IMG_3371.jpg

Some renovation shots of the house:

IMG_2768.jpg
IMG_3052.jpg
IMG_3201.jpg
IMG_2700.jpg
IMG_3389.jpg
IMG_3405.jpg
IMG_3739.jpg
IMG_3569.jpg
IMG_3635.jpg
IMG_3651.jpg
  (Wes helped us with an acoustic design for the house.  Here the RPG panels arrive.)

(Wes helped us with an acoustic design for the house.  Here the RPG panels arrive.)

IMG_3714.jpg

We started moving gear into the house in September and when the work was done our first session was for The Killers upcoming Christmas single.  It was October 8, 2016 and it was very cold outside. Unfortunately somewhere along the way we forgot to have the gas turned on, and as it was the weekend, we had no heat, nor way to get the heat turned on.   A quick trip to Home Depot for some small electric heaters and our first session was a success.

IMG_3794.jpg

 

Here is how the house looks now:

SWP_8723.jpg
SWP_8703.jpg
SWP_8680.jpg
SWP_8601.jpg
SWP_8575.jpg
SWP_8557.jpg
SWP_8545a.jpg
SWP_8519.jpg

We thought we would be in the house - our temporary home - for about a year. Although it’s a bit cozy and we miss so much of our great gear that’s sequestered in storage, it has thankfully been a very functional space. We love the location, clients love the vibe.  So now, two years later, work has finally just begun on the new building. In that time we’ve met with even more banks, finally obtaining an SBA 504 loan with good terms from US Bank. We met with and received bids from many contractors - each one having to dig in and figure out the complexities of studio construction.  We worked with the city to make whatever modifications/clarifications/compromises they asked for and obtained our construction permits. We got all the way through the process and decided it was too expensive, then went back to adjust the plans and have them re-bid, only to discover that in the time it took to go through the process again overall construction prices had gone up by almost exactly the same amount we’d saved.  We finally deciding to go with Zadok Construction as GC. Harris Architecture here in Provo designed our new shell, and Suzanne Hall with Alice Lane Interior Design designed the common areas in the new space as well as the interior details of the house. We’ve assembled a great team and everyone is excited to see it actually happening now.

We’ve given up trying to predict or plan this project. The contractor says it could be 6 months. We’re preparing ourselves for double that.

It has been a long journey here, just look at all the locations that were possibilities:
 

studio location map.jpg

 

And finally, for this post anyway, here is our soon to be floor plan:

floor plan for internet_edited-1.jpg

And some future elevations:

Elevations for internet.jpg

If you’ve actually read this far, let me just say thanks for hanging in there.   I promise not to be nearly so long winded in future posts - just felt the need to get this all down for the sake of documenting the journey.   Planning and preparing for this construction project has been so all-consuming over the past number of years sometimes I forget that having it finished and open and working is actually the end goal. Here’s hoping I can keep this new studio running for longer than it took me to write this first post.